Hanger 1 is a vodka made out of San Francisco's famous fog water.

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Tranquillo is a 'productivity lamp' that will only work if you turn off your phone.

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This article was originally published on The Drum, written by Red Peak Strategist, Kristen Nozell. 

Budweiser’s temporary rename to ‘America’ is bold and somewhat controversial –everyone seems to have an opinion. But that aside, Budweiser’s move is something more, for those of us who love the art and science of branding. Bud’s 'America' is a manifestation of the power of packaging design and a brilliant reminder of the value of a moniker in marketing.

The current Budweiser can design has been in circulation just since the beginning of this year, when the sideways “bow” design was replaced, a redesign that taps into the rich Budweiser iconography, using design elements that were first used in the 1950s. Through consistent usage and significant media spend, Budweiser has created a design system that today is so recognizable, the marketer has permission to remove its name altogether from its packaging and replace it with a substitute, without fear of misidentification or losing brand equity.

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Happy Friday! Check out what's been inspiring us this week. 

These optical illusions make crosswalks look like roadblocks, forcing drivers to slow down.

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This article was originally published on Momentology, written by Red Peak Strategist, Madeleine Kronovet. 

By expressing personality, brands have a much better chance of forming a connection with a customer. This is highly valuable in the long run, and directly impacts feelings of love and loyalty towards a brand. Consumers want to feel as though they’re interacting with an individual – not a business entity.

We often hear how Millennials are tethered to their electronic devices. “Life is what happens when you’re looking at your smartphone.”

It makes sense. Our phones are so much more than just phones – they’re mirrors, wallets, alarm clocks, taxi hailers, and envy instigators. DJs, brokerage houses, and health monitors. Rightfully so, we spend a lot of time on them.

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This article was originally published on Adweek, written by Christine Birkner. 

As consumers look for ways to relieve stress through creativity, adult coloring books have taken the nation by storm, populating Amazon's list of best-selling books and popping up in marketing efforts for Timberland and other brands. And no, it's not just a millennial obsession. "Although millennials are driving the growth, the handmade movement is a trend that touches all generations," noted NPD Group analyst Leen Nsouli.

"We carry 150 coloring book titles now, and we've seen a great customer response—so great that we've pushed out into other surfaces that people can color on: T-shirts, playhouses and canvases," said Stephen Carlotti, evp of marketing at Michaels Craft Stores. "We see great opportunity going forward as long as we continue to innovate."

But when the coloring book trend fades, what products could take its place? Here are five contenders, according to retailers.

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This article was originally published on Digiday, written by Tanya Dua. 

In 2012, Kaelen Walsh surprised his high school girlfriend by writing “Prom?” on 500 ping-pong balls and subsequently stuffing them in her locker. The moment she opens the locker, as well as the planning that went in beforehand, has been captured in a YouTube video with over 1.6 million views — one of the thousands of other videos across social media that document cutesy prom antics.

Dresses, tuxedos, corsages — heck, even limos — don’t cut it anymore. Teens are taking prom to a whole new level, staging elaborate “promposals” with puppies, K-pop flash mobs and personalized Snapchat geofilters. For a generation raised on social media, prom is just another event to overshare online. Brands have taken note.

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Take a look at what's been inspiring us around the studio this week!

The SF MoMA is reopening after a 3-year closure, and will debut a reimagined audioguide experience, a smart app that tells you where to go and what you're seeing.

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by Jade Lu

In April, the Magnum Ice Cream Popup Store opened in Soho, blocks away from the Red Peak office, immediately prompting an office outing for ice cream. This seasonal store is based off of a Make-Your-Own model. Customers choose all aspects of their ice cream from the Magnum bar; including flavor, type of chocolate dip, and toppings from over twenty options. Some Red Peak favorites were gold flakes, rose petals, chopped nuts, and pink sea salt. The entire store is designed as an experience – from the moment you walk in, customers are greeted with Instagram-worthy artwork and displays on all walls of the store and are led to the decadent Dipping Bar where they watch their creation being made by the friendly and enthusiastic Magnum staff. 

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This article was originally published on Digiday, written by Tanya Dua. 

Misty Copeland is making ballet so mainstream she’s about to have a Barbie doll in her likeness.

The tie-up with Barbie — part of Barbie’s “Sheroes” program spotlighting women breaking boundaries — is the latest in a string of marketing deals she has struck with big brands like Dr. Pepper and Under Armour. Her inspirational story of overcoming numerous family, professional and health struggles has also been captured in a children’s book, a memoir as well as a documentary. Last year, she was also named as one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world.

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